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EARN UP TO   18 CMEs
  500  PLACES ONLY

Submit your original work for an oral presentation on Sunday 3 April and apply to be considered for the Annual IamBrain.org 2022 Prize for the best scientific work and presentation, with a financial value of £500.

Please upload your abstract below as a 500-word MS Word Document, with a title, authors, institution, and four paragraphs 1. Introduction 2. Material and methods 3. Results 4. Conclusion. 

The deadline for abstract submission is Monday 14 March, 5 pm GMT.  

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     IamBrain.org2021
2022 ANNUAL MEETING  
A WORLDWIDE ONLINE SYMPOSIUM

EARN UP TO   18 CMEs
 500  PLACES ONLY

LIVE ONLY
RECORDINGS WON'T BE AVAILABLE AFTER THE EVENT

 Conference Spotlight -
 The human   connectome  project 

David van Essen, University of Washington

The HCP is one of the most ambitious projects in the history of neuroscience, supported by the NIH as a multi-institutional consortium aiming to “build a ‘network map’ that will shed light on the anatomical and functional connectivity within the healthy human brain, as well as to produce a body of data that will facilitate research into brain disorders such as dyslexia, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, and schizophrenia.”

David van Essen, the key architect of this staggering project, will analyse data outcomes and connectivity maps. In addition, he will discuss cortical parcellation models published in his highly cited Nature article. 

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 Conference Spotlight -
 Broca's original brains 

Nina Dronkers, University of Berkley

Professor Dronkers holding the brain of one of the most famous neurological patients of the 19th century, Louis Victor Leborgne, who could utter one syllable only, from the age of 30 until his death, 21 years later.

After his death on 17 April 1861, his autopsy performed by the French surgeon Pierre Paul Broca who had examined Leborgne while he was alive, leading to establishing the famous Broca's area.

Professor Dronkers (left) had the unique opportunity to scan the brain of Leborgne (and the second Broca's patient, Lelong) using high-resolution volumetric MRI. During our Symposium, she will be discussing some of the spectacular imaging findings.

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 Conference Spotlight -
 The landmark dual   streams language   model 

GREGORY HICKOK, University of California, Irving

How and where the brain understands and processes speech has been an unsolved scientific question for centuries. 

In 2007, Hickok, along with Poeppel, proposed the currently and widely accepted neuroanatomical model of speech processing, emphasizing a dual (ventral and dorsal) route processing.

Multiple subsequent studies have validated, many parts of this model, while the effort to fully understand the neural basis of human language continues.